Daytona 500: what we learned in America.

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Sunday night is good for NASCAR.

It’s no secret that motor racing has been in a state of inadequacies in recent years. If there is no Dale Earnhardt Jr., Jeff Gordon and Tony Stewart behind the wheel, then the Cup Series needs to create new stars and it needs to be done in a hurry.

NASCAR was once a weekly destination.

But for whatever reason, the fan base has not fully embraced the stars of the past decade. Either they are too rich, too unreliable or too politically correct to offset the loss of traditional names such as dynhart, Darrell walprip and rasheed Wallace.

From this perspective, the daytona 500 star machine is a fantastic start to NASCAR’s new era.

A day later, there were still strong opinions about what happened in the final lap of the American competition. Some say that Austin Dillon was apparently left behind by Alec armilla, while others said he had to leave Dillon because of his resistance.

No matter where you stand, strong opinions are cool. This is the sport that needs to move forward – the fans who care.

What we learned from daytona 500 can be seen below:

Why does anyone always have to be at fault?

On Sunday night, the fans seemed to be angry with armilla not the man himself. Armilla admitted to holding back the back, and Dillon never lifted, and they ran together in the daytona 500.

At the end of the game, he wasn’t even angry.

He made a high stop for Dillon. When Dillon escaped, almira responded, forcing Dillon to return to the top. At this point, Dillon was locked on the bumper and rotated no. 10 as he flew back toward the wall.

“I saw his momentum coming and I stopped and did what I needed to do to win the daytona 500,” Almirola said. “I won’t let him have it, I will not stay at the bottom, let him slip in the outside, so I stopped him, he touched my bumper, and pushed me, I thought I would be fine, don’t know why I fell in love with. ”

In general, we all have hindsight.

In the past 12 hours, we have the ability to enjoy the freeze each decision, and conduct autopsy on the logarithmic minutes at a time, temporarily forget these decisions based on real-time decision making at a speed of 200 miles per hour, and a place in the history of NASCAR.


Dillon said after the game that he was in a trance in the last lap, as if his eyes were rolling in the back of his head and he wouldn’t lift it. He said he knew what he had done to stop Dillon because they had no choice.

“I think I’m getting dark,” Dillon said. “Your eyes roll in your head, and you go, and I never lift them.”

If Almirola doesn’t stop, he loses.

If Dillon didn’t stay on the gas pedal, he would lose it.

Fans seem to think that these cars are like a video game, and the decision is as simple as a throttle or a lift, left or right. These are the most volatile limiters that NASCAR ever allowed.

This is not the question of whether Dillon overtly ignores life or limb. Give up altruism. Limiter racing, if you even want to call it a racing car, is a unique discipline with a unique set of rules. The driver had to push, and the driver had to stop at daytona and taradia.

Is Dillon worth a certain amount of censorship? Of course. However, the fact that Almirola is not the first to criticize the critics suggests this.

At the end of the day, the two drivers are competing in the earl’s cup. They took everything down and won the biggest game of the year. Somebody has to win. Somebody loses. Despite what happened in the Xfinity series on Saturday, there was nothing to do with it.

Should we treat this game as a fan?

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